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Saturday, February 18, 2006

its all bout your stench

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Wednesday, January 11, 2006

internet ulod

Internet
Contents
^ Up
<- Previous
Next ->

Living Internet
Internet Worms
Worms - Types and Habitats
Penetration of a remote system can be accomplished in any of three ways... In each case the worm arranges to get a remote command interpreter which it can use to copy over, compile and execute the 99-line bootstrap. The bootstrap sets up its own network connection with the local worm and copies over the other files it needs, and using these pieces a remote worm is built and the infection procedure starts over again.
- Donn Seeley; A Tour of the Worm; University of Utah.
Internet worms are truly autonomous virtual viruses, breaking into computers and replicating without human assistance and usually without human knowledge.
Internet worms are viruses that have a self-replication feature that enables them to spread across the Internet from one computer to another automatically. Worms are particularly interesting technological constructs, with an intriguing mathematical structure and complexity. They fascinate because they take the digital imitation of life to another step -- they autonomously search for computers, penetrate them, and replicate their intelligence to continue the process.
An Internet worm can be contained in any kind of virus, program or script. Sometimes their inventor will release them into the wild in a single copy, leaving them to replicate by themselves through a variety of stratagems and protocols.
History. Worms use a variety of methods to propagate across the Internet. Early worms simply scanned the local network drives and folders and inserted themselves into programs wherever they could, trusting human beings to move disks and directories around in the normal course of things so they could continue to spread.
Since the late 1990's, many Internet worms have been Visual Basic script viruses which replicate on Windows computers by interacting with the user's email program to send themselves to many (often all) of the addresses in the address book. Once on a new machine, they repeat the process with the new user's address book, quickly expanding the number of people reached. Some of the worst outbreaks of email worms have spread around the world within just a few hours, and email remains the Internet worm's fastest known transmission method.
Beginning in 2001, the most dangerous worms started to employ weaknesses in the Windows operating system to attack machines directly across the Internet. When a significant Windows weakness was found, Microsoft would patch it, hackers would release worms to attack it a few weeks later, and any unpatched machine connected to the Internet would soon be compromised. With several hundred million machines running Windows, statistically speaking a lot don't get patched immediately, so there are always thousands of vulnerable systems. Even computers inside a firewall protected intranet are at risk as long as there is one weak link somewhere -- an unprotected machine on the Internet able to reach the rest of the intranet. Microsoft introduced automatic operating system updates to help solve this problem.
The most successful Internet worm of all time, in terms of sheer saturation, was the code red worm, which scanned the Internet for vulnerable Windows computers running the IIS web server to install itself and continue the infection. For example, a list of the code red infected computers trying to break into the LivingInternet site on August 7, 2001, can be found here. (Fortunately, the site was running on the Apache web server.)
A wide range of other inventive strains of Internet worms have employed security weaknesses in IRC, MAPI, sendmail, finger, and other programs and protocols. A few worms began to be discovered for Linux in the late 1990's as it became more popular across the Internet and some vulnerabilities were found, but the strong security architecture of Linux has kept the number of problems relatively low.The first worm. The first worm disabled most of the Internet then existing. Robert Morris, a Computer Science graduate student at Cornell University and (embarrassingly) son of the Chief Scientist at the National Computer Security Center, wrote a 99 line program in the C language designed to self-replicate and propagate itself from machine to machine across the Internet. The worm performed the trick by combining a bug in the debugging mode of the sendmail program used to control email on almost all Internet computers, a bug in the finger program, and the Unix rexec and rsh commands.
On November 2, 1988, Morris released his worm, but did so from an MIT computer to disguise his origin. In his view, only one thing went wrong -- the worm started replicating at a much faster rate than he had predicted, and began crashing and disabling computers across the Internet.
Morris sent out an anonymous message telling people how to disable the worm, but because it had brought down the Internet, the message about how to disable it couldn't get through. The worm eventually infected more than 6,000 computers across the Internet. Within a day teams of programmers at the University of California at Berkeley and Purdue University reverse engineered the worm and developed methods of stopping it. The Internet then came back to normal in a couple of days.
Morris claimed that he had intended his worm as an innocent experiment and hadn't planned it to have any negative effects. Nonetheless, he was eventually convicted of violating the computer Fraud and Abuse Act (Title 18), and sentenced to three years of probation, 400 hours of community service, and a $10,050 fine. His appeal was rejected in March, 1991.
At least one good thing resulted from this incident -- the Computer Emergency Response Team, or CERT, was formed by ARPA in response to the Morris worm incident to track and provide information on Internet security threats.





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}
document.write("");
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internet ulod

Internet
Contents
^ Up
<- Previous
Next ->

Living Internet
Internet Worms
Worms - Types and Habitats
Penetration of a remote system can be accomplished in any of three ways... In each case the worm arranges to get a remote command interpreter which it can use to copy over, compile and execute the 99-line bootstrap. The bootstrap sets up its own network connection with the local worm and copies over the other files it needs, and using these pieces a remote worm is built and the infection procedure starts over again.
- Donn Seeley; A Tour of the Worm; University of Utah.
Internet worms are truly autonomous virtual viruses, breaking into computers and replicating without human assistance and usually without human knowledge.
Internet worms are viruses that have a self-replication feature that enables them to spread across the Internet from one computer to another automatically. Worms are particularly interesting technological constructs, with an intriguing mathematical structure and complexity. They fascinate because they take the digital imitation of life to another step -- they autonomously search for computers, penetrate them, and replicate their intelligence to continue the process.
An Internet worm can be contained in any kind of virus, program or script. Sometimes their inventor will release them into the wild in a single copy, leaving them to replicate by themselves through a variety of stratagems and protocols.
History. Worms use a variety of methods to propagate across the Internet. Early worms simply scanned the local network drives and folders and inserted themselves into programs wherever they could, trusting human beings to move disks and directories around in the normal course of things so they could continue to spread.
Since the late 1990's, many Internet worms have been Visual Basic script viruses which replicate on Windows computers by interacting with the user's email program to send themselves to many (often all) of the addresses in the address book. Once on a new machine, they repeat the process with the new user's address book, quickly expanding the number of people reached. Some of the worst outbreaks of email worms have spread around the world within just a few hours, and email remains the Internet worm's fastest known transmission method.
Beginning in 2001, the most dangerous worms started to employ weaknesses in the Windows operating system to attack machines directly across the Internet. When a significant Windows weakness was found, Microsoft would patch it, hackers would release worms to attack it a few weeks later, and any unpatched machine connected to the Internet would soon be compromised. With several hundred million machines running Windows, statistically speaking a lot don't get patched immediately, so there are always thousands of vulnerable systems. Even computers inside a firewall protected intranet are at risk as long as there is one weak link somewhere -- an unprotected machine on the Internet able to reach the rest of the intranet. Microsoft introduced automatic operating system updates to help solve this problem.
The most successful Internet worm of all time, in terms of sheer saturation, was the code red worm, which scanned the Internet for vulnerable Windows computers running the IIS web server to install itself and continue the infection. For example, a list of the code red infected computers trying to break into the LivingInternet site on August 7, 2001, can be found here. (Fortunately, the site was running on the Apache web server.)
A wide range of other inventive strains of Internet worms have employed security weaknesses in IRC, MAPI, sendmail, finger, and other programs and protocols. A few worms began to be discovered for Linux in the late 1990's as it became more popular across the Internet and some vulnerabilities were found, but the strong security architecture of Linux has kept the number of problems relatively low.The first worm. The first worm disabled most of the Internet then existing. Robert Morris, a Computer Science graduate student at Cornell University and (embarrassingly) son of the Chief Scientist at the National Computer Security Center, wrote a 99 line program in the C language designed to self-replicate and propagate itself from machine to machine across the Internet. The worm performed the trick by combining a bug in the debugging mode of the sendmail program used to control email on almost all Internet computers, a bug in the finger program, and the Unix rexec and rsh commands.
On November 2, 1988, Morris released his worm, but did so from an MIT computer to disguise his origin. In his view, only one thing went wrong -- the worm started replicating at a much faster rate than he had predicted, and began crashing and disabling computers across the Internet.
Morris sent out an anonymous message telling people how to disable the worm, but because it had brought down the Internet, the message about how to disable it couldn't get through. The worm eventually infected more than 6,000 computers across the Internet. Within a day teams of programmers at the University of California at Berkeley and Purdue University reverse engineered the worm and developed methods of stopping it. The Internet then came back to normal in a couple of days.
Morris claimed that he had intended his worm as an innocent experiment and hadn't planned it to have any negative effects. Nonetheless, he was eventually convicted of violating the computer Fraud and Abuse Act (Title 18), and sentenced to three years of probation, 400 hours of community service, and a $10,050 fine. His appeal was rejected in March, 1991.
At least one good thing resulted from this incident -- the Computer Emergency Response Team, or CERT, was formed by ARPA in response to the Morris worm incident to track and provide information on Internet security threats.





(function () {
var query = location.href.toLowerCase().substr(0, 6) == "https:" ? "https" : "http";
document.cookie='sitetrafficstats = 1';
query += "://www.sitetrafficstats.com/image.php?account=599" +
"&rf=" + escape(document.referrer) +
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"&cl=" + document.cookie.length +
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if (screen) {
query += "&cd=" + screen.colorDepth +
"&rs=" + escape(screen.width+' x '+screen.height);
}
document.write("");
})();

internet ulod

Internet
Contents
^ Up
<- Previous
Next ->

Living Internet
Internet Worms
Worms - Types and Habitats
Penetration of a remote system can be accomplished in any of three ways... In each case the worm arranges to get a remote command interpreter which it can use to copy over, compile and execute the 99-line bootstrap. The bootstrap sets up its own network connection with the local worm and copies over the other files it needs, and using these pieces a remote worm is built and the infection procedure starts over again.
- Donn Seeley; A Tour of the Worm; University of Utah.
Internet worms are truly autonomous virtual viruses, breaking into computers and replicating without human assistance and usually without human knowledge.
Internet worms are viruses that have a self-replication feature that enables them to spread across the Internet from one computer to another automatically. Worms are particularly interesting technological constructs, with an intriguing mathematical structure and complexity. They fascinate because they take the digital imitation of life to another step -- they autonomously search for computers, penetrate them, and replicate their intelligence to continue the process.
An Internet worm can be contained in any kind of virus, program or script. Sometimes their inventor will release them into the wild in a single copy, leaving them to replicate by themselves through a variety of stratagems and protocols.
History. Worms use a variety of methods to propagate across the Internet. Early worms simply scanned the local network drives and folders and inserted themselves into programs wherever they could, trusting human beings to move disks and directories around in the normal course of things so they could continue to spread.
Since the late 1990's, many Internet worms have been Visual Basic script viruses which replicate on Windows computers by interacting with the user's email program to send themselves to many (often all) of the addresses in the address book. Once on a new machine, they repeat the process with the new user's address book, quickly expanding the number of people reached. Some of the worst outbreaks of email worms have spread around the world within just a few hours, and email remains the Internet worm's fastest known transmission method.
Beginning in 2001, the most dangerous worms started to employ weaknesses in the Windows operating system to attack machines directly across the Internet. When a significant Windows weakness was found, Microsoft would patch it, hackers would release worms to attack it a few weeks later, and any unpatched machine connected to the Internet would soon be compromised. With several hundred million machines running Windows, statistically speaking a lot don't get patched immediately, so there are always thousands of vulnerable systems. Even computers inside a firewall protected intranet are at risk as long as there is one weak link somewhere -- an unprotected machine on the Internet able to reach the rest of the intranet. Microsoft introduced automatic operating system updates to help solve this problem.
The most successful Internet worm of all time, in terms of sheer saturation, was the code red worm, which scanned the Internet for vulnerable Windows computers running the IIS web server to install itself and continue the infection. For example, a list of the code red infected computers trying to break into the LivingInternet site on August 7, 2001, can be found here. (Fortunately, the site was running on the Apache web server.)
A wide range of other inventive strains of Internet worms have employed security weaknesses in IRC, MAPI, sendmail, finger, and other programs and protocols. A few worms began to be discovered for Linux in the late 1990's as it became more popular across the Internet and some vulnerabilities were found, but the strong security architecture of Linux has kept the number of problems relatively low.The first worm. The first worm disabled most of the Internet then existing. Robert Morris, a Computer Science graduate student at Cornell University and (embarrassingly) son of the Chief Scientist at the National Computer Security Center, wrote a 99 line program in the C language designed to self-replicate and propagate itself from machine to machine across the Internet. The worm performed the trick by combining a bug in the debugging mode of the sendmail program used to control email on almost all Internet computers, a bug in the finger program, and the Unix rexec and rsh commands.
On November 2, 1988, Morris released his worm, but did so from an MIT computer to disguise his origin. In his view, only one thing went wrong -- the worm started replicating at a much faster rate than he had predicted, and began crashing and disabling computers across the Internet.
Morris sent out an anonymous message telling people how to disable the worm, but because it had brought down the Internet, the message about how to disable it couldn't get through. The worm eventually infected more than 6,000 computers across the Internet. Within a day teams of programmers at the University of California at Berkeley and Purdue University reverse engineered the worm and developed methods of stopping it. The Internet then came back to normal in a couple of days.
Morris claimed that he had intended his worm as an innocent experiment and hadn't planned it to have any negative effects. Nonetheless, he was eventually convicted of violating the computer Fraud and Abuse Act (Title 18), and sentenced to three years of probation, 400 hours of community service, and a $10,050 fine. His appeal was rejected in March, 1991.
At least one good thing resulted from this incident -- the Computer Emergency Response Team, or CERT, was formed by ARPA in response to the Morris worm incident to track and provide information on Internet security threats.





(function () {
var query = location.href.toLowerCase().substr(0, 6) == "https:" ? "https" : "http";
document.cookie='sitetrafficstats = 1';
query += "://www.sitetrafficstats.com/image.php?account=599" +
"&rf=" + escape(document.referrer) +
"&sl=" + escape(navigator.systemLanguage) +
"&tz=" + (new Date()).getTimezoneOffset() +
"&je=" + navigator.javaEnabled() +
"&cl=" + document.cookie.length +
"&pg=" + escape(location.pathname);
if (screen) {
query += "&cd=" + screen.colorDepth +
"&rs=" + escape(screen.width+' x '+screen.height);
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document.write("");
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internet worms(ulod sa internet)



A big 'Thank you!' to everyone who donated in this fundraiser!Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales's personal appeal for donations is still ongoing.
Tax-deductibility of donations - Budgets - Final daily report - Wikipedia merchandise
Computer worm
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Jump to: navigation, search
A computer worm is a self-replicating computer program, similar to a computer virus. A virus attaches itself to, and becomes part of, another executable program; however, a worm is self-contained and does not need to be part of another program to propagate itself. They are often designed to exploit the file transmission capabilities found on many computers. The main difference between a computer virus and a worm is that a virus can not propagate by itself whereas worms can. A worm uses a network to send copies of itself to other systems and it does so without any intervention. In general, worms harm the network and consume bandwidth, whereas viruses infect or corrupt files on a targeted computer. Viruses generally do not affect network performance, as their malicious activities are mostly confined within the target computer itself.
The name 'worm' was taken from The Shockwave Rider, a 1970s science fiction novel by John Brunner. Researchers writing an early paper on experiments in distributed computing noted the similarities between their software and the program described by Brunner and adopted the name.
The first implementation of a worm was by two researchers at Xerox PARC in 1978. [1] The authors, John Shoch and Jon Hupp, originally designed the worm to find idle processors on the network and assign them tasks, sharing the processing and so improving the whole network efficiency. [2]
The first worm to attract wide attention, the Morris worm, was written by Robert Tappan Morris, who at the time was a graduate student at Cornell University. It was released on November 2, 1988, and quickly infected a great number of computers on the Internet at the time. It propagated through a number of bugs in BSD Unix and its derivatives. Morris himself was convicted under the US Computer Crime and Abuse Act and received three years probation, community service and a fine in excess of $10,000.
In addition to replication, a worm may be designed to do any number of things, such as delete files on a host system or send documents via email. More recent worms may be multi-headed and carry other executables as a payload. However, even in the absence of such a payload, a worm can wreak havoc just with the network traffic generated by its reproduction. Mydoom, for example, caused a noticeable worldwide Internet slowdown at the peak of its spread.
A common payload is for a worm to install a backdoor in the infected computer, as was done by Sobig and Mydoom. These zombie computers are used by spam senders for sending junk email or to cloak their website's address.[3] Spammers are thought to pay for the creation of such worms [4] [5], and worm writers have been caught selling lists of IP addresses of infected machines.[6] Others try to blackmail companies with threatened DoS attacks.[7] The backdoors can also be exploited by other worms, such as Doomjuice, which spreads using the backdoor opened by Mydoom.
Whether worms can be useful is a common theoretical question in computer science and artificial intelligence. The Nachi family of worms, for example, tried to download then install patches from Microsoft's website to fix various vulnerabilities in the host system — the same vulnerabilities that they exploited. This eventually made the systems affected more secure, but generated considerable network traffic (often more than the worms they were protecting against), rebooted the machine in the course of patching it, and, maybe most importantly, did its work without the explicit consent of the computer's owner or user. As such, most security experts deprecate worms, whatever their payload.
[edit]

Penalties
In January 2002 programmer Simon Vallor was sentenced to two years in prison for releasing the "mass mailer" viruses Gokar, Admirer and RedesiB. [8] Vallor claimed he thought that the viruses were harmless. [9]
In February 2003, two people belonging to a group called "THr34t-Krew" were arrested in relation to the creation and release of the T-K Worm [10]. In May 2005 Andrew Harvey and Jordan Bradley admitted creating and releasing the T-K Worm which went on to infect 19,000 computers.[11]. In October 2005 Harvey received three months in prison and Bradley received six months. [12].
[edit]

See also
Timeline of notable computer viruses and worms
[edit]

External links
The Wildlist - List of viruses and worms 'in the wild' (i.e. regularly encountered by anti-virus companies)
Worm parasites - Listed worm descriptions and removal tools.
Jose Nazario discusses worms - Worms overview by a famous security researcher.
Computer worm suspect in court
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_worm"
Category: Malware
Views
Article
Discussion
Edit this page
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internet worms(ulod sa internet)



A big 'Thank you!' to everyone who donated in this fundraiser!Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales's personal appeal for donations is still ongoing.
Tax-deductibility of donations - Budgets - Final daily report - Wikipedia merchandise
Computer worm
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Jump to: navigation, search
A computer worm is a self-replicating computer program, similar to a computer virus. A virus attaches itself to, and becomes part of, another executable program; however, a worm is self-contained and does not need to be part of another program to propagate itself. They are often designed to exploit the file transmission capabilities found on many computers. The main difference between a computer virus and a worm is that a virus can not propagate by itself whereas worms can. A worm uses a network to send copies of itself to other systems and it does so without any intervention. In general, worms harm the network and consume bandwidth, whereas viruses infect or corrupt files on a targeted computer. Viruses generally do not affect network performance, as their malicious activities are mostly confined within the target computer itself.
The name 'worm' was taken from The Shockwave Rider, a 1970s science fiction novel by John Brunner. Researchers writing an early paper on experiments in distributed computing noted the similarities between their software and the program described by Brunner and adopted the name.
The first implementation of a worm was by two researchers at Xerox PARC in 1978. [1] The authors, John Shoch and Jon Hupp, originally designed the worm to find idle processors on the network and assign them tasks, sharing the processing and so improving the whole network efficiency. [2]
The first worm to attract wide attention, the Morris worm, was written by Robert Tappan Morris, who at the time was a graduate student at Cornell University. It was released on November 2, 1988, and quickly infected a great number of computers on the Internet at the time. It propagated through a number of bugs in BSD Unix and its derivatives. Morris himself was convicted under the US Computer Crime and Abuse Act and received three years probation, community service and a fine in excess of $10,000.
In addition to replication, a worm may be designed to do any number of things, such as delete files on a host system or send documents via email. More recent worms may be multi-headed and carry other executables as a payload. However, even in the absence of such a payload, a worm can wreak havoc just with the network traffic generated by its reproduction. Mydoom, for example, caused a noticeable worldwide Internet slowdown at the peak of its spread.
A common payload is for a worm to install a backdoor in the infected computer, as was done by Sobig and Mydoom. These zombie computers are used by spam senders for sending junk email or to cloak their website's address.[3] Spammers are thought to pay for the creation of such worms [4] [5], and worm writers have been caught selling lists of IP addresses of infected machines.[6] Others try to blackmail companies with threatened DoS attacks.[7] The backdoors can also be exploited by other worms, such as Doomjuice, which spreads using the backdoor opened by Mydoom.
Whether worms can be useful is a common theoretical question in computer science and artificial intelligence. The Nachi family of worms, for example, tried to download then install patches from Microsoft's website to fix various vulnerabilities in the host system — the same vulnerabilities that they exploited. This eventually made the systems affected more secure, but generated considerable network traffic (often more than the worms they were protecting against), rebooted the machine in the course of patching it, and, maybe most importantly, did its work without the explicit consent of the computer's owner or user. As such, most security experts deprecate worms, whatever their payload.
[edit]

Penalties
In January 2002 programmer Simon Vallor was sentenced to two years in prison for releasing the "mass mailer" viruses Gokar, Admirer and RedesiB. [8] Vallor claimed he thought that the viruses were harmless. [9]
In February 2003, two people belonging to a group called "THr34t-Krew" were arrested in relation to the creation and release of the T-K Worm [10]. In May 2005 Andrew Harvey and Jordan Bradley admitted creating and releasing the T-K Worm which went on to infect 19,000 computers.[11]. In October 2005 Harvey received three months in prison and Bradley received six months. [12].
[edit]

See also
Timeline of notable computer viruses and worms
[edit]

External links
The Wildlist - List of viruses and worms 'in the wild' (i.e. regularly encountered by anti-virus companies)
Worm parasites - Listed worm descriptions and removal tools.
Jose Nazario discusses worms - Worms overview by a famous security researcher.
Computer worm suspect in court
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_worm"
Category: Malware
Views
Article
Discussion
Edit this page
History
Personal tools
Sign in / create account

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Monday, January 09, 2006

detective







« »
Pretty girl, Lupin, Louie.Saturday, July 13, 2002 at 1:32 pm
I love this song, and I dedicate it to Brad *sigh*:
Pretty girl is suffering, while he confesses everythingPretty soon she’ll figure out what his intentions were aboutAnd that’s what you get for falling againYou can never get ‘em out of your headAnd that’s what you get for falling againYou can never get ‘em out of your head
It’s the wayThat he makes you feelIt’s the wayThat he kisses youIt’s the wayThat he makes you fall in love
She’s beautiful as usual with bruises on her ego andHer killer instinct tells her to be aware of evil menAnd that’s what you get for falling againYou can never get ‘em out of your headAnd that’s what you get for falling againYou can never get ‘em out of your head
Pretty girl, pretty girl
Pretty girl is suffering, while he confesses everythingPretty soon she’ll figure outYou can never get ‘em out of your head
Last night Brian came over to watch my Lupin movie … AFTER we’d seen Reign of Fire lol. It was pretty awesome, except he was allergic to something in my basement, so when it was over we went out on my deck for like 2 hours … and as usual, didn’t end up getting to bed until like 4 am haha.
And tonight I’m going to another DC Sessions concert with Shaune and Willi. Hopefully it’ll be cool … but I’m pissed ’cause I was really looking forward to going to the Sister Hazel one next Saturday … but no, we just HAVE to go to Cleveland on THAT specific day. Grr. But oh well … I saw them at the Fairfax Fair, so it’s not too bad.
Oh yeah, and Louie un-blocked me! He said he was never mad at me, just needed to back away and have time to think about stuff. But then he was like, I don’t like Brian, I never will, and if I’m given the opportunity to hurt him, I’ll take it. So *sigh* … it sucks. Just how long is it gonna take for him to realize that Brian isn’t a “sexual predator”? Oh well …
I’m gonna go take a shower now and do some random stuff, but talk to everyone later.
—Claire

Sunday, January 08, 2006

its all bout your stench

its all bout your stench

Mortgage -Tips

Mortgage -Tips

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Search: All News & Blogs Yahoo! News Only News Photos Video/Audio Advanced
Doctors Give Sharon Another Brain Scan
By JOSEF FEDERMAN, Associated Press Writer 58 minutes ago
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister
Ariel Sharon' name=c1> SEARCHNews News Photos Images Web' name=c3> Ariel Sharon was taken for another brain scan on Sunday to help doctors decide when to bring the Israeli leader out of an induced coma, but one of Sharon's surgeons ruled out the possibility that he would resume his duties.

if (window.yzq_a)The surgeon, Dr. Jose Cohen, told Channel 2 TV that Sharon's chances of survival are high, but that his ability to think and reason would be impaired.
"He will not continue to be prime minister, but maybe he will be able to understand and to speak," the Argentina-born Dr. Cohen told Spanish-language reporters Saturday. His comments, which reinforced the widespread belief that Sharon's days as prime minister are over, were published in The Jerusalem Post.
Sharon has been hospitalized since suffering a massive stroke on Wednesday night. He has undergone two rounds of surgery to stop bleeding in the brain and to relieve pressure inside his skull. Doctors have placed him in what they call an induced coma — under heavy sedation and connected to a respirator — to give him time to heal.
Sharon's medical team gathered early Sunday to decide when to lift the sedation and pull him out of the coma, Hadassah Hospital spokesman Ron Krumer said. They suspended the meeting after about an hour for the brain scan, and were scheduled to reconvene later in the day, he added.
Earlier, the hospital said Sharon's condition had not changed overnight, and that he remained in critical but stable condition.
Channel 10 TV reported that doctors were inclined not to lift the sedation Sunday.
When waking Sharon from his coma, doctors will be "looking for some sort of response," the director of Hadassah Hospital, Dr. Shlomo Mor-Yosef, said on Saturday. "If there is no response, that would be bad news."
At the Israeli Cabinet's regular weekly meeting Sunday, Acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert told ministers that Sharon would want everyone to return to work on the country's pressing security, social and economic issues.
"This we will continue to do," he said. "We will continue also to carry out the wishes of Sharon, to manage affairs as necessary."
Before his collapse, Sharon appeared headed to win a third term in office at the head of Kadima, a new, centrist party he formed to build on the momentum created by his seminal summer withdrawal of soldiers and settlers from the
Gaza Strip' name=c1> SEARCHNews News Photos Images Web' name=c3> Gaza Strip.
Although
Israel' name=c1> SEARCHNews News Photos Images Web' name=c3> Israel and the Palestinians have not managed to use the withdrawal to jump-start long-stalled peace talks, there had been hope peacemaking would resume after Palestinian elections in January and Israeli balloting in March.
It is far from clear if any of Sharon's potential successors would have the charisma, credibility and hard-charging spirit that helped him to begin carrying out the historic task of drawing Israel's final borders.
Dr. Gal Ifergan, a neurologist at Israel's Soroka Hospital who is not treating Sharon, said doctors on Sunday would look at factors such as the size of the brain, the results of CT scans and general body functions like blood pressure and body temperature before deciding whether to end the sedation.
A brain scan Saturday showed intracranial swelling had gone down slightly, Mor-Yosef said.
Sharon, who experienced a mild stroke on Dec. 18, felt weak on Wednesday and was rushed to Hadassah from his ranch in southern Israel when a blood vessel on the right side of his brain burst, causing massive cerebral hemorrhaging.
Outside experts have said the outlook for recovery is grim, and aides said they do not expect Sharon to return to the prime minister's office.
King Abdullah of Jordan called Olmert on Saturday to express "hope that the Mideast peace process would not be affected by any circumstances and developments surrounding Ariel Sharon's illness," Jordan's official Petra news agency reported.
Since Wednesday's stroke, Israelis from all walks of life have lamented Sharon's likely departure from the political scene because, with his larger-than life persona and warrior credentials, Sharon was widely seen as the man most capable of untangling the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
At synagogues throughout Israel on Saturday, the Jewish Sabbath, worshippers set aside political differences and prayed for Sharon's health.
David Zvuluni, huddled with three other worshippers outside his Jerusalem synagogue, said he opposed Sharon's Gaza withdrawal, but at this moment wished him only well.
"I don't believe there's a synagogue in the country that's not praying for Sharon," he said. "There are just a few lunatics, but the rest of the people of Israel are all praying for him, even those, like us, who opposed him."

Thursday, January 05, 2006



[ part of [Lupin III] ]Alternative title: ルパン三世 くたばれ!ノストラダムス (Japanese) Lupin III: Die, Nostradamus! Lupin III: Le profezie di Nostradamus (Italian) Lupin III: To Hell With Nostradamus! Rupan Sansei: Kutabare! Nostradamus (Japanese)Age rating: Teenagers (May contain bloody violence, bad language, nudity)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Science Fiction, ShounenPlot Summary: After a diamond heist in Brazil, Lupin hides the gem in a doll and boards a plane headed out of the country. While on board, the doll is stolen by a little girl named Julia, who's nanny is none other than Fujiko Mine. Before Lupin can get the doll back, the plane is hijacked and the girl is kidnapped. The kidnappers are after the same thing that Fujiko is after - a book of Nostradamus prophecies hidden in Juilia's father's tower. Lupin and the gang join forces to save the girl, get the diamond back, and discover the secrets surrounding this strange book.
Related anime: Lupin III S (manga) (sequel) Lupin III Y (manga) (sequel)Alternative title: Lupin III - World's Most Wanted New Lupin III New Lupin the Third Shin Lupin III (Japanese) Shin Lupin Sansei (Japanese) Shin Rupan Sansei (Japanese)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, ShounenPlot Summary: Lupin III is a charming, clownish thief with an eye for the ladies. Together with gun slinger Jigen, and sword weilding Goemon, Lupin spends his days stealing treasure, seducing women, and escaping from the law. The law in this case being the persistent Inspector Zenigata and the innovative Melon Cop. Beautiful Fujiko also complicates Lupin's life, sometimes working with him, but almost always betraying him.
Lupin III: World's Most Wanted (manga)

/www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=2023/www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedi
[ part of [Lupin III] ]Alternative title: ルパン三世 くたばれ!ノストラダムス (Japanese) Lupin III: Die, Nostradamus! Lupin III: Le profezie di Nostradamus (Italian) Lupin III: To Hell With Nostradamus! Rupan Sansei: Kutabare! Nostradamus (Japanese)Age rating: Teenagers (May contain bloody violence, bad language, nudity)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Science Fiction, ShounenPlot Summary: After a diamond heist in Brazil, Lupin hides the gem in a doll and boards a plane headed out of the country. While on board, the doll is stolen by a little girl named Julia, who's nanny is none other than Fujiko Mine. Before Lupin can get the doll back, the plane is hijacked and the girl is kidnapped. The kidnappers are after the same thing that Fujiko is after - a book of Nostradamus prophecies hidden in Juilia's father's tower. Lupin and the gang join forces to save the girl, get the diamond back, and discover the secrets surrounding this strange book.

[ part of [Lupin III] ]Alternative title: ルパン三世 くたばれ!ノストラダムス (Japanese) Lupin III: Die, Nostradamus! Lupin III: Le profezie di Nostradamus (Italian) Lupin III: To Hell With Nostradamus! Rupan Sansei: Kutabare! Nostradamus (Japanese)Age rating: Teenagers (May contain bloody violence, bad language, nudity)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Science Fiction, ShounenPlot Summary: After a diamond heist in Brazil, Lupin hides the gem in a doll and boards a plane headed out of the country. While on board, the doll is stolen by a little girl named Julia, who's nanny is none other than Fujiko Mine. Before Lupin can get the doll back, the plane is hijacked and the girl is kidnapped. The kidnappers are after the same thing that Fujiko is after - a book of Nostradamus prophecies hidden in Juilia's father's tower. Lupin and the gang join forces to save the girl, get the diamond back, and discover the secrets surrounding this strange book.
Related anime: Lupin III S (manga) (sequel) Lupin III Y (manga) (sequel)Alternative title: Lupin III - World's Most Wanted New Lupin III New Lupin the Third Shin Lupin III (Japanese) Shin Lupin Sansei (Japanese) Shin Rupan Sansei (Japanese)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, ShounenPlot Summary: Lupin III is a charming, clownish thief with an eye for the ladies. Together with gun slinger Jigen, and sword weilding Goemon, Lupin spends his days stealing treasure, seducing women, and escaping from the law. The law in this case being the persistent Inspector Zenigata and the innovative Melon Cop. Beautiful Fujiko also complicates Lupin's life, sometimes working with him, but almost always betraying him.
Lupin III: World's Most Wanted (manga)

/www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=2023/www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedi
[ part of [Lupin III] ]Alternative title: ルパン三世 くたばれ!ノストラダムス (Japanese) Lupin III: Die, Nostradamus! Lupin III: Le profezie di Nostradamus (Italian) Lupin III: To Hell With Nostradamus! Rupan Sansei: Kutabare! Nostradamus (Japanese)Age rating: Teenagers (May contain bloody violence, bad language, nudity)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Science Fiction, ShounenPlot Summary: After a diamond heist in Brazil, Lupin hides the gem in a doll and boards a plane headed out of the country. While on board, the doll is stolen by a little girl named Julia, who's nanny is none other than Fujiko Mine. Before Lupin can get the doll back, the plane is hijacked and the girl is kidnapped. The kidnappers are after the same thing that Fujiko is after - a book of Nostradamus prophecies hidden in Juilia's father's tower. Lupin and the gang join forces to save the girl, get the diamond back, and discover the secrets surrounding this strange book.

[ part of [Lupin III] ]Alternative title: ルパン三世 くたばれ!ノストラダムス (Japanese) Lupin III: Die, Nostradamus! Lupin III: Le profezie di Nostradamus (Italian) Lupin III: To Hell With Nostradamus! Rupan Sansei: Kutabare! Nostradamus (Japanese)Age rating: Teenagers (May contain bloody violence, bad language, nudity)Genres: Adventure, Comedy, Science Fiction, ShounenPlot Summary: After a diamond heist in Brazil, Lupin hides the gem in a doll and boards a plane headed out of the country. While on board, the doll is stolen by a little girl named Julia, who's nanny is none other than Fujiko Mine. Before Lupin can get the doll back, the plane is hijacked and the girl is kidnapped. The kidnappers are after the same thing that Fujiko is after - a book of Nostradamus prophecies hidden in Juilia's father's tower. Lupin and the gang join forces to save the girl, get the diamond back, and discover the secrets surrounding this strange book.

Wednesday, January 04, 2006

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In August 1967, Futabasha Publishing's Manga Action weekly magazine began running a new manga by Kato Kazuhiko, a.k.a. "Monkey Punch". The title enchanted many of the Japanese readers including a man named Fujioka Yutaka, an executive for Tokyo Movie Shinsha Co. (TMS). TMS decided to purchase the rights to make an animated version of the manga in the same year.
Originally, TMS planned to team up with Toho and produce a theatrical film. Some of the best talent (including Osumi Masaki, Shibayama Tsutomu, and Otsuka Yasuo) were brought together and feverishly worked on producing the "Pilot Film". Two versions were made, a Cinemascope and TV version, as it was assumed during the planning phase that the film would be released in theaters and then later on television.
While the pilot film was completed in 1969, it consumed a great deal of time and money. TMS and Toho could not come to terms about budget for the film; this and several other problems caused the pilot film to never reach theaters. TMS decided to sell "Lupin III" for TV anime even though its more adult-oriented themes would make it a difficult sell. In October 1971, TMS managed to sell the idea to Yomiuri TV (YTV); they would air the series on television.
TMS could not round up the entire staff of the pilot film as too much time had elapsed. Production of the series went on with Osumi and Otsuka as its core. On 24 October 1971, the first episode of Lupin III (commonly known as the "green jacket series") aired on YTV. It was one of the first anime series with an adult sensibility. It was also grounded in reality as evidenced by the details of the automobiles, guns, etc. depicted in the series. It had all the tools to capture an appreciative adult audience, but the show did poorly in the ratings.
By the time episode three aired, Osumi was removed from the production of the show. Miyazaki Hayao and Takahata Isao were brought in to replace Osumi. The emphasis of the show was also changed to a more humorous, cartoon-style flavor. Despite these changes, the series ended after only twenty-three episodes. While its initial broadcast run was a disaster, the series experienced an explosive surge in popularity through numerous reruns.
With this surge of popularity, the decision was made to make a second television series. Fans quickly came to call this new series Shin Lupin III (New Lupin III); it is also widely known as the "red jacket series". The first episode aired on 3 October 1977 and differed in content from the first series. The plots were more conscious of children; the settings were expanded to cover the entire globe, and the character's idiosyncrasies were simplified. While fans of the original series did not think much of the changes, the second series garnered huge ratings and aired 155 episodes over three years.
During the second series broadcast, Lupin finally made it to the big screen. While a live-action film version of Lupin was made in 1974, it was not until 16 December 1978 that an animated Lupin film was shown in theaters. Simply titled Lupin III, the film captured the adult themes and dark atmosphere of the manga and the first part of the first TV series. The film was a success both critically and commercially; naturally, another film had to be made to capitalize on this success.
On 17 December 1979, Castle of Cagliostro became the second animated Lupin film to hit theaters. Directed by Miyazaki Hayao, the film was a wonderful action & adventure film with many memorable scenes.1 It was more light-hearted than the first film as Miyazaki felt that the film should represent Lupin in the twilight of his career. Lupin is more nice and sentimental as he is looking for fulfillment that cannot be found in thievery.2 The film did not receive as much industry or critical acclaim initially. However, the film increased in popularity through TV broadcasts and magazine listings; today, it is considered to be a classic piece of animation.
A third television series began airing in 1984; Lupin III Part III, the "pink jacket series", aired fifty episodes over two years. This series focused more on slapstick humor. A third theatrical feature appeared in the middle of this broadcast run; 1985 saw the release of Legend of the Gold of Babylon; this film reflected the slapstick nature of the third series. After the third series ended, 1987 saw the release of Fuma Conspiracy direct to the home video market. It eventually made its appearance in theaters as well.1
The production company for Fuma decided to drop Yamada Yasuo as the voice of Lupin because of the budget. Monkey Punch was informed of this decision by the production company; Monkey Punch felt he had no right to enforce decisions regarding voice actors. He told the production company that he understood their choice, but that they needed to make Yamada understand this fact as well. Unfortunately, this was not made clear to Yamada, and he felt that Monkey Punch had directly dropped him from the project. Yamada took pride in being the voice of Lupin and was upset about this decision. Monkey Punch tried to clear up the misunderstanding in later conversations with Yamada, but their relationship remained strained until Yamada's death.3
A year went by before the next Lupin title came out. In 1989, an annual tradition began; each year since 1989 has seen the release of a TV special or a theatrical film. The first special was Bye Bye Liberty and featured the return of Yamada Yasuo as the voice of Lupin. Yamada would continue to voice Lupin for five more years until his tragic death in 1995.
Kurita Kanichi was picked to fill Yamada's shoes, a daunting task to be sure. Kurita has managed to capture though not completely recreate Yamada's voice for Lupin. In 1995, the fourth original theatrical film To Hell with Nostradamus! was released.
In 1996, Monkey Punch directed the fifth film Dead or Alive; this film returned Lupin to its roots, roots not seen since the first film aired back in 1978. The film was dark, violent, and relied less on humor than recent titles. Lupin fans consider it one of the best titles in the Lupin filmography. It was often rumored that Monkey Punch directed this film due to his dissatisfaction with the way Nostradamus and specials had been portraying Lupin. However, he has stated that he unwillingly accepted the director's chair after being approached for the position. He credits the voice actors and other production people for making the film what it is.4
It is now over thirty years since Lupin was first aired on television; specials continue to be produced on a yearly basis. While the history of Lupin anime is long, it is far from over.
1 House, Michael. "Meet... Lupin III ...An Japanese Superhero!", Toon Magazine 1.7 (1995): 25 - 30.
2 Ragone, August. "1981 conversation with Monkey Punch at the San Diego Comic Con", From a post to the Yahoo! LupinTheThird Group (22 Feb 2003).
3 "Interview with Monkey Punch", Hokkaido Shimbun (8 May 2001).
4 Divers, Allen. "Interview: Monkey Punch", Anime News Network (13 Nov 2003).
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The Lupin III Encyclopedia is © 2000 - 2005 by Luis A. Cruz. All rights reserved.